Mask Mandate on Federal Lands

Who can forget the optics on President Biden’s first day in office with a stock of executive order folders on his left and a pen in his right hand?

One of those EOs issued a federal mask mandate for certain areas of the United States under which the President has authority to issue policies — and one of them is federal lands, i.e. all lands operated by the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and other agencies. 

Since so much of this land is recreational and used often by RVers, it’s caused some confusion about when to use a mask while camping on federal land. Reading the actual text of the mandate is vague.

In a nutshell, while camping on Federal lands, follow CDC guidelines currently in place for social distancing when around people outside your family or RV-mates. The guidelines simply states: “Masks may not be necessary when you are outside by yourself away from others, or with other people who live in your household.”

You certainly don’t need a mask while hiking, fishing, biking, or taking a stroll under the stars…or doing anything else outside away from others. If we all use our common sense, camping on Federal lands should be no different than the CDC guidelines for anywhere else, including right here at Floridays RV Park.

How Floridays Stacks Up

Camper Report recently published an article on the 10 Most Common Complaints Against RV Parks. We thought you might want to see how Floridays stacks up.

First, a little background. Floridays was never a “brand new” park for us. We purchased what was know as the Angle Inn Mobile Court in the autumn of 2010 — and it was an eyesore! But our location in one of the last remaining “old Florida” small towns along US Federal Hwy 1 made it an easy decision. Right away we got to work tearing out invasive plants species and replacing it with young oak trees and native vegetation to create year-round shade for the RV pads. In 2017, we added the washhouse with separate bathrooms and showers for ladies and men and a laundry facility with brand new washers, dryers and folding tables. Our 2017 videos of the Washhouse buildout have great aerial shots of the park.

We erected birdhouses to attract Purple Martin swallows, updated our Wi-Fi and electrical boxes, added a secure covered mailroom, and much more. We aren’t fancy, just honest.

So how does Floridays stack up to Camper Report’s top 10 complaints?

  1. Not enough space. We have 84 sites well spaced for privacy and all with pads.
  2. Bad attitudes from staff and owners. We never discriminate and have an on-site full-time park manager with tons of experience.
  3. Bad electric hookups. Our pedestals are correctly wired, have surge protectors, and are routinely checked.
  4. Gross water. Florida water quality in Martin County is considered reliable with high standards for excellence. Check it out here.
  5. Dirty bathhouses and common areas. Our bathhouses could be considered “fancy” because they are large and new. Common areas are well-maintained, but not “fancy.”
  6. Neighbor problems. We’re not a permanent residence park; maximum stay is six months. Most of our guests return year after year, know one another, and enjoy campfires, cookouts, and leisure time together.
  7. Un-level sites. Parking surfaces are designed to be flat. 
  8. Mud, sand, and dirt. The park has a moderate grade for good drainage, and seasonal Florida rains are quickly absorbed by our sandy soil. Most of our roadways are paved which helps maneuvering around the park and prevents erosion. Outdoor rugs are encouraged.
  9. Bug issues. We routinely spray for ants and Martin County sprays for mosquito control. 
  10. Feeling unsafe. Both the Hobe Sound community at large, and the Floridays community specifically, are close-knit and look out for one another.

Have you stayed with us? Be sure to let us know how we are doing by leaving a review on our Facebook page.

Why We Love Our Floridays Weather

People often confuse weather and climate but they are different. Weather refers to the conditions of the atmosphere over a short period of time, and climate is how the atmosphere is over long periods of time. Then there’s the powerful Gulf Stream that transports nearly 4 billion cubic feet of water per second, nearly 300 times faster than the flow of the Amazon River, and its effect on weather and climate. 

Welcome to Floridays RV Park located in subtropical Martin County, Florida, where we enjoy a great climate all year round — well, almost. Warm breezes that originate in the Gulf of Mexico make a northeasterly curve around the tip of Florida and up the eastern seaboard, skirting offshore at Martin County before making a dogleg flow out to sea. 

Named the Florida Current, these warm waters rarely fall below 75 degrees F, even during the winter months. When easterly winds move over this warm water the effect is that winter temperatures in Martin County are milder than anywhere else in the SE United States. Over the course of the year, the temperature typically varies from 56°F to 89°F and is rarely below 42°F or above 93°F.

On top of our mild winters and subtropical climate, Hobe Sound to the locals is simply “paradise.” This small, colorful community with clean air and ocean breezes has no pollution, no smog, and offers all who live or visit here stunning sunsets over uncrowded beaches and sunrises that rival the best in the world.

Hobe Sound: A Special Place

Along the entire eastern seaboard of Florida, there’s no other town quite like Hobe Sound. The townspeople of Hobe Sound are immensely protective of this small piece of “paradise” and they are fiercely protective of its culture, land, and historical significance. 

It began in the late 1600s when Captain Jonathan Dickinson’s merchant ship “Reformation” sailing from Jamaica to Philadelphia broke apart and sunk in a storm north of the Jupiter Inlet, leaving 25 survivors to fend for themselves against the anger and hostility of an Indian tribe referred to as the Jobe (pronounced Ho-bey). They mistreated the survivors terribly, stripping them of their clothes and forcing them to sleep in sand-flea-invested sand pits for warmth. Against all odds, Dickinson and his group escaped and walked almost the entire way to St. Augustine where they were able to find help getting to Philadelphia. 

Hobe Sound, presumably named after an English-language interpretation of the Jobe tribe, connects to the Jupiter Inlet by an intracoastal waterway. In modern times, the waters of the intracoastal are referred to as Hobe Sound, and so is the town stretching along its length. The outlying land mass that lies between the Atlantic and Hobe Sound is Jupiter Island, home of more than a few of the rich and famous, including golfer Tiger Woods. 

Just a few miles south of Floridays RV Park, wild and beautiful Jonathan Dickinson State Park stands as a tribute to Dickinson, his family and crew, the first historical figures of this magical place near Hobe Sound. 

When you visit Floridays RV Park, we hope you will take a few hours to visit the Park, walk the trails, visit the education center, perhaps rent a canoe or kayak, or experience a ranger-guided tour up the river to see alligators, turtles, osprey, eagles, and even visit a very unusual pioneer homestead.

Best COVID Restaurants Near Floridays

You don’t want to cook, or you have something to celebrate, or you love food — especially when someone else does the cooking. Whatever your motivation for dining out, it’s become especially problematic in 2020. So we’ve done some scouting of the best places for foodies to hang out in Martin County, that feature outdoor seating and are less than a 20-minute drive from Floridays RV Park.

Twisted Tuna
This local favorite has bars inside and out and outdoor dining dockside with a view of Manatee Pocket. Watch the fishermen come and go as you munch on fresh tuna and other seafood with a twist. 4290 SE Salerno Road, Port Salerno. https://thetwistedtuna.com/

Taste Casual Dining
Just a short drive from Floridays in downtown Hobe Sound, Taste is where a little bit of New England meets South Florida. Traditional and contemporary cuisine in a friendly, neighborhood environment with outdoor dining on the patio. 11750 SE Dixie Highway, Hobe Sound http://www.tastehobesound.com/

Flash Beach Grill
This surf and turf restaurant really is like eating at the beach but without the wind and waves. Tap your toes in the sand right under your table while you listen to live music. Sip a tropical cocktail and choose from a menu with fresh fish, steak, burgers, salads and creative appetizers in this fun place with a local vibe. 9126 SE Bridge Road, Hobe Sound. Find them on Facebook.

Blue Pointe Bar and Grill
This outdoor restaurant located alongside the Intracoastal Waterway between Hobe Sound and Tequesta offers great food, live music every day, and true waterfront casual dining. There’s even a swimming pool for a quick dip after renting a paddleboard or kayak. The menu is pure Florida from oysters and calamari to soup and salad, to sandwiches and entrees. 18701 SE Federal Highway, Tequesta. https://www.bluepointebarandgrill.com/

Harry & the Natives
As Harry says, this is “Hobe Sound’s only waterfront restaurant…when it rains.” If you want to go where the locals go, you have to go to Harry’s for breakfast, lunch or dinner. It’s down-home cooking done right with a wait staff that is second to none. There’s a full bar, a covered cafe, a large tiki-covered dining area with live music, and even a gift shop. Walls are so covered with clever sayings that you may spend most of your first visit just reading them all. You can even bring your pet if you eat in the outdoor dining areas. Just down the street from Floridays at Federal Hwy & Bridge Road. You can’t miss it. https://harryandthenatives.com/

If you’ve eaten at any of these local places, help out your fellow RVers by leaving a review on our Facebook page. @FloridaysRVPark