Hobe Sound Incorporation Debate

On August 28, voters in Hobe Sound, the hometown of Floridays RV Park, will decide whether or not to incorporate as an official town. The debate seems to be about different visions for how to move into the future while retaining the unique character of Hobe Sound. For those in our Park that are permanent residents, or just anyone interested in the potential outcome, the following is a little background and a few resources.

Hobe Sound is one of the last truly small towns along the eastern coastline of south Florida. It has a small population of about 15,300 people. People live in Hobe Sound because they enjoy the small town feeling, lack of traffic, low crime, and an “Old Florida” feel. Read about the history of Hobe Sound here.

Floridays MapCurrently, Hobe Sound is not officially a town at all—it’s a community governed by Martin County. Even if Hobe Sound incorporates, most of its services would still be provided by the County, including fire & rescue, law enforcement, and other important services.

In 2017, a few long-time residents and business owners in Hobe Sound became concerned that Hobe Sound could become overdeveloped or lose it’s historic small town environment. They paid, with their own money, to have a Feasibility Report drawn up. You can read it here.

Opponents of the incorporation effort are also vocal. You can read letters of opposition published in the TCPalm News here, and in the Palm Beach Post here.

There have been numerous meetings to debate the plan and answer residents’ questions. If you live in Hobe Sound but never attended a meeting, you can learn more and watch a video about protecting Hobe Sound on their website.

Regardless of the voting outcome, Floridays is committed to remain a “little bit of paradise” with friendly neighbors and a laid-back way of life for those who enjoy the RV Lifestyle.

How RVers Deal With Noisy Neighbors

If there is one single fear that all RVers have, it’s choosing or being assigned a pad or parking space next the RV with a barking dog or a family that keeps the TV volume to a pitch resembling that of a jet plane. While these annoyances are more prevalent at campgrounds than in RV parks, the problem of the consistently inconsiderate, whiner, shouter, curser or partier that cares less about being a good neighbor is real, and it’s annoying.

Confronting an excessively noisy neighbor is not the solution. Moving is an option, but not always possible, and it doesn’t solve the problem, it just hands it off the next RVer taking your vacated spot.

rules & regs 2018The communal aspect of RV camping and travel is usually one of respect. You want peace and quiet in the neighborhood, and so does everyone else. Most RV parks and campgrounds have basic quiet hours from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. Rules aren’t always knowingly broken. The guy with the noisy diesel truck may have no clue that neighbors are irritated with his comings and goings. The woman with the high-shrilling laugh may have never been told how annoying it is.

As our guest, you must also follow certain rules to protect the park and it’s natural environment and to assure everyone’s safety and security. As the times and the trends change, we update our rules. We strive to be fair—to see things from our guests’ perspective. When new RV products hit the market, like fresh ideas for screened rooms, we may amend our rules to accommodate.

We’re fortunate to be located in one of the last true Old Florida towns: small, friendly, and quiet. Our sensible park rules are us, doing our part.

Download Floridays RV Park Rules & Regulations

Food Network Again Goes RVing

Does anyone remember the old Food Network show featuring a guy in an RV? Jim O’Connor’s show, The Secret Life Of… always received mixed reviews. Most loved his almost manic but amicable personality. Others just marveled that a guy living in an RV who was better at “eating” than “cooking” could have his own cooking show.

Fast forward to 2018 and RVing is again being featured on the Food Channel. In the opening show, the hosts demonstrated to viewers how to “elevate their camping experience” with two fun recipes made in the kitchen of a 5th wheel.

In Episode 2, a young couple looks for the perfect RV to take out on the open road on a limited budget in order to start a new chapter in their lives. 
Watch this episode and others online »

The Go RVing PR team is also preparing for upcoming national television spots that will showcase RVing including four features on the business network CNBC this summer. Go RVing will take over the plaza outside the New York Stock Exchange to set up an RV, which will be the setting for “Closing Bell” anchors to come outside and interview an RV industry executive. The live segments are scheduled May to August.

In addition, RVs will be featured on the highly-watched “FOX & Friends” morning show on June 2. Go RVing spokespersons representing key RVer demographics will appear throughout the morning against the backdrop of an urban campground the PR team will construct outside the FOX studio. The morning will include three RVs—two trailers and a motorhome.

“These are exciting opportunities to let viewers see how versatile RVs can be, and to imagine how they might use one themselves,” said director of media relations Kevin Broom. “Whether it’s a family traveler, an outdoor adventurer, or a grandparent interested in multigenerational travel, we’re going to make sure viewers understand there’s an RV that’s right for them.

Florida’s Amazing State Parks

RV parks and campgrounds in the Florida Keys can be expensive in season. But from April through November, the water activities, sightseeing, shopping, dining, and relaxing under the swaying palms of this U.S. version of the Caribbean is balm to the soul.

Rain is usually on the menu during July and August, but the weather in early spring and autumn can be ideal. There are four RV-friendly Florida State Parks in the Keys, some with water views and sea breezes. Bahia Honda, Curry Hammock, Long Key and John Pennekamp each offer sites for around $40 per night. Not a bad deal considering that these parks offer beach access. Here’s a rundown of what you can expect:

bahia Honda

Bahia Honda

Located on Big Pine Key, this park has 86 sites offering beautiful sunsets and sunrises over the water, and private sites hidden by lush green foliage. There are beaches on both ends of the park for toe-dipping, fishing, snorkeling, and swimming. Inland there’s a butterfly trail, and a nice trail hike to a remnant of an original Overseas Highway bridge—the highway being near the southern end of U.S. 1 and the bridge now almost a century old.

Curry Hammock

Located near Marathon, this park’s 28 large sites with tenting areas are generally coveted by RVers because there are no bad sites here—all ocean front and breezy. Hurricane Irma hit Marathon hard, so there’s less vegetation than before, but the lack of trees does make for great satellite reception and good cell service. Hiking trails, lots of iguanas, nearby kayaks rentals and shopping, restaurants, and ice cream shops are a short drive away.

John Pennekamp

Located in Key Largo, this park offers 47 sites which makes for cramped conditions during season, but off-season is not a problem. The seafood dining options are the best! Key Largo Fisheries offers fresh seafood to go or to eat on picnic tables overlooking the marina. The Conch House and The Fish House are within walking distance. There’s plenty to do in Key Largo, so boredom is not problem. Five stars for convenience and activities!

Long Key

Located in Long Key, this park offers 60 sites all overlooking the ocean. Each site has a picnic table and ground grill, plus all the regular electric and water hookups (bring an extension cord to this park). Here, the ocean is shallow and sea grass feels soft on wading feet. The park is a natural ecosystem, and you can wade out into the ocean for a long ways. There was damage from Irma, so call to be sure all the facilities are open.

All of the oceanfront Florida Keys State parks were damaged by Hurricane Irma in 2017. Be sure to check before making reservations online to be sure that the park you like will meet your expectations.

How to Tell It’s Spring in South Florida

Spring started on March 20, but few in south Florida noticed. No crocus buds popped up through snow, no cherry blossom scent filled the air. In Florida’s panhandle thousands of college students stream to the beaches, but here in Martin County, our 40-feet building height restriction means fewer large hotels, and in turn, no noticeable annual spring break madness.alligator

But nature provides plenty of clues that it’s springtime in Florida. Last month we wrote about the annual arrival of our gentle giant, the manatee, to our rivers and inlets. They are followed by the annual shark migration, a trek considered to be the largest migration in U.S. coastal waters. The usual count is around 15,000 blacktip sharks arriving from the north, but this year numbers are down, leading scientists to worry because blacktip sharks help keep coral reefs and sea grasses healthy by “cleaning out” weak fish species.

Above the beaches, birds are flying in formation heading northward. Sea turtles are nesting along beaches. Near swamps and bogs, Florida’s male alligators are bellowing and fighting over the females. Butterflies flitting about are more plentiful and the bald cypress trees are contemplating their summer foliage.

Spring in south Florida is all around us…if we look, listen and learn. Happy spring!