RV Humor Just Comes with the Territory

Life in an RV Park or Campground requires a sense of humor… otherwise we’d all go mad.

In 2016, Roverpass, makers of a reservation system for RV Campgrounds, had a little fun with a “true story” contest with the RV Humor Facebook group for those who appreciate the humorous side of living in a small metal house on wheels.

We thought you’d enjoy a “reader’s digest” version from the winning entries (or read the stories here).

Kevin’s recollection of an early spring canoe trip down a river in the Ozark Mountains when someone in the boat yelled “hornets” and, in turn, Kevin jumped out of the canoe into freezing water. Did someone see a real hornet’s nest or just a clump of wet leaves in an overhang along the bank? We’ll never know.

Jim, a Navy guy stationed in Scotland in the ’70s, recalls taking a VW camper to explore the Scottish Highlands. They arrived in the dark of night and pulled into a rock quarry for the night. Next morning, doing what we all do first thing, Jim was about to step off a 100 foot cliff to water below. Good enough, but there’s more: a fish story, without fish, for a very peculiar reason!

Debbie’s hilarious story about having one of the first-ever pop-up campers of the ’60s and the endless problems and embarrassment of setting it up, to the amusement of everyone else in the park. At the end, she sells the camper at a cheap price, but doesn’t explain to buyer exactly why. 

Roverpass has a good collection of illustrated RV jokes too. Hint: Knock knock. Who’s there? RV. RV who? RV there yet? Want more?

There’s something about the RV lifestyle that calls for having a sense of humor. Do you have a funny story to share? Send it to info@floridaysrvpark.com along with your name and any relevant photos and we’ll share them with friends and fans of Floridays.

South Florida Loves Art Festivals!

The highlight of the year for our small town of Hobe Sound along Florida’s Treasure Coast is the annual Festival of the Arts. On the first weekend in February, amazing artwork, crafts, and culinary delights line Old Dixie Highway for a 2-day affair that rivals similar festivals all over Florida during high season.

Hobe Sound’s Festival of the Arts

If you missed Hobe Sound’s Art Festival, you can still find one within a day’s drive:

Sarasota, 8-9 February
Coconut Point, 15-16 February
Stuart, 22-23 February
Ft. Lauderdale, 7-8 March
Palm Beach Gardens, 14-15 March
Coral Springs, 21-22 March

See all Florida Art Fest Events.

Most shows have a nice balance of fine art and crafts, but if you prefer “craft fairs only” Howard Alan Events, the event planner for Hobe Sound’s annual festival, will delight your senses and help you find that special trinket, live plant, or home made health and beauty product. 

See Dates for All Florida Craft Festivals

And for Art enthusiasts in our own backyard who still can’t get too much eye-candy for one month, check out ArtsFest (sponsored by the Arts Foundation of Martin County) this coming Saturday and Sunday in Stuart.

Boat Parades Near Floridays

There’s nothing like a beautiful boat parade to put south Floridians into the Christmas spirit. It just so happens that Hobe Sound is fairly equal distance to boat parade in Martin County to the north, and Palm Beach County to the south.

Christmas fun waterside

North Boat Parade – Martin County

The Annual Martin County Boat Parade is Saturday, December 8, beginning at the Jensen Beach Causeway at 6:00 PM. The Parade route will  proceed by Sandsprit Park, into the Manatee Pocket, and ending at the Twisted Tuna Restaurant around 8:00 PM where the winners will be announced.

South Boat Parade – Palm Beach County

The 25th Annual Palm Beach Holiday Boat Parade is December 7, led by a Zambelli traveling fireworks display that navigates up the Intracoastal Waterway from North Palm Beach to the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse. Sit and see the parade from Juno Park, Burt Reynolds Park, Waterway Park, Sawfish Bay Park, Jupiter Riverwalk, Harbourside Place and Lighthouse Park.

Making Thanksgiving Dinner in an RV

Even if you’re a seasoned veteran of the RV lifestyle, there’s always room for improvement when it comes to the American tradition of celebrating Thanksgiving — or some say, Turkey Day. So we’re providing the ultimate guide to how to make Thanksgiving dinner in your RV.

  1. Camping World — How to host an RV Thanksgiving when space and kitchen commodities are at a minimum
  2. KOA Blog — How to enjoy Thanksgiving in your RV
  3. Do It Yourself RV — Tips to cook Thanksgiving dinner in an RV
  4. RV Share — How to cook a turkey when you don’t have a grill available
  5. Fulltime Families — 5 ways to make Thanksgiving dinner work in an RV
  6. .
Photo courtesy of Full-time Families (it makes our mouth water)

Have a wonderful holiday, and before you begin planning how you’ll celebrate, we recommend reading an article by Melanie Kirkpatrick, author of the book Thanksgiving: The Holiday at the Heart of the American Experience. It’s a good reminder of not how we celebrate, but why.

The Happy Camper

When we think of the idiom “happy camper” we can’t help but connect it with the RV lifestyle. But first, for those who are scratching their head over the word “idiom”, allow us to explain. An idiomatic expression —an idiom— is a type of informal language that has meaning for those who use it. And with repetition of the idiom over time, that meaning often changes! 

If someone told you to “hold your tongue” you would not open your mouth and wrap your fingers the best you could around it. Nope. Instead, you’d not say what you were about to say or wanted to say. We hold our tongue when we want to say something but know better.

One story about the origination of the idiom “happy camper” suggests that it started somewhere in the 1800s when kids started to go off to summer camps. Kids that were miserable and unable to separate themselves from their parents, hung on to anything stationary to prevent themselves from being dragged into the buggy for the short ride to the campsite where they would sleep under the stars and cook over an open fire. The camp counselors referred to these kids as “not a happy camper.” We couldn’t agree that kids living in the 1800s needed to get away from the TV during summer break, so we moved on to a more probable explanation.

According to another source, the phrase “happy camper” originates from the quote, “not a happy camper” used in the resort industry and National Park Service around 1986 in Yosemite National Park by employees of the Yosemite Park and Curry Company.

Dan Quayle, former Vice President of the United States is reported to have once said, “You all look like happy campers to me. Happy campers you are, happy campers you have been, and, as far as I am concerned, happy campers you will always be.”

According to the Dictionary of American Slang the phrase originated in California with movie and show business folks referring to kids hating to go to summer camp while their parents worked.

Regardless of its source, the expression today is widely used to describe a happy and contented person whether he is on a camping trip or not. We hope that all our guests at Floridays RV Park are happy campers, and we work diligently to assure that the expression “I’m a happy camper” can be heard loud and clear.